Where birds thrive, people prosper.

Join our flock and help protect the birds we love and the rich ecology of the state we call home.

Texans Come Together

When Hurricane Harvey struck the Texas coast at the end of August, it dealt a major blow to the colonial water birds we love such as the Brown Pelicans, Roseatte Spoonbills, Black Skimmers, Great Blue Herons, and Great Egrets. At Audubon Texas, we are proud that migrating birds found refuge at our Audubon Centers across the state, providing temporary relief until they could complete their journey. 

We truly believe that “If you take care of the birds, you take care of most of the big problems in the world.” When floodwaters cleared, Audubon Texas scientists were on the ground assessing the damage to critical bird habitat along the middle and upper regions of the Texas gulf coast. This work was not easy and is far from being complete, but we will not stop until the birds you love, from Reddish Egret to Tricolored Heron, have safe and secure habitat to return to during the upcoming nesting season, and for years to come.

In Texas we know the power of coming together to help one another. Together we have the knowledge, power, and influence to make a significant and lasting impact to protect the rich ecology of the state we love. On behalf of the nearly 600 species of birds who call Texas home, and the 40,000 school students and 100,000 overall visitors who visit one of our nature centers: Dogwood Canyon, Mitchell Lake or Trinity River, we ask you to Join the flock by supporting us today. 

With warmest regards and best wishes for a healthy and happy holiday season, 

The Honorable Rob Franke, Mayor, Cedar Hill,
Texas Board Chair, Audubon Texas 

Brian Trusty, Vice President, Central Flyway
National Audubon Society 

Happening Now

D-Bird
Citizen Science

D-Bird

A citizen science effort to monitor bird collisions across the state.

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Plants for Birds
Conservation

Plants for Birds

Over the last 100 years, urban sprawl has transformed 150 million acres of farmland and native habitats across the United States into buildings, hardscape, and 40 million acres of highly manicured lawns. Filled with exotic plants, these urban landscapes no longer support the healthy, functioning ecosystems that birds and wildlife need.

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How We Work

Texas Audubon Centers

Dogwood Canyon Audubon Center
Chapters & Centers

Dogwood Canyon Audubon Center

Nestled in geologically-unique canyon full of rare species in Cedar Hill, TX.

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Mitchell Lake Audubon Center
Chapters & Centers

Mitchell Lake Audubon Center

The historic Leeper House anchors spectacular native gardens at the gateway to perhaps the best birding in San Antonio, on Mitchell Lake and the surrounding 1,200 acres of native habitat.

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Trinity River Audubon Center
Chapters & Centers

Trinity River Audubon Center

Stunning prairie views, five miles of hiking trails through the Great Trinity Forest, and excursions on the Trinity River are just the beginning of this world away, just ten minutes from downtown Dallas.

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Learn about some of our state's iconic species:

How you can help, right now